TRUTH IN PROGRESS DOCUMENTARY "From Selma to Stonewall" launched TODAY, JUNETEENTH, on Kickstarter!

JuneteenthCelebration"JUNETEENTH."  Imagine that after the Defense of Marriage Act had been rescinded, there would have been a delay in communicating the action to some sections of the nation. This is what happened following the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. The information was not given to slaves in Texas until more than two and a half years after slavery ended. They did not hear the word until June 19, 1865. Thus, "Juneteenth" has become a day of remembrance and celebration in African American communities throughout the nation. "JUNE 28." LGBTQ Pride month in June has its roots in the Christopher Street Liberation Day which was held a year after the Stonewall Riots, which was on June 28, 1969. This uprising against police assaults took place at the Stonewall Inn bar on Christopher Street in New York City.

On this Juneteenth and in honor of LGBTQ Pride celebrations worldwide, Truth in Progress is celebrating by launching our crowd-funding campaign on Kickstarter for our 30-minute documentary film FROM SELMA TO STONEWALL! This is the work and dream of all us and a major milestone on our journey!

 

Gil-and-Marilyn

WE ARE THRILLED TO SHARE WITH YOU THE  FILM TRAILER AND THE STORY BEHIND THE STORY.

PLEASE GO TO OUR PAGE TODAY (CLICK HERE!!!) AND BECOME AN OFFICIAL KICKSTARTER BACKER!

AND THEN PLEASE KEEP THE MOMENTUM GOING BY SHARING THE LINK WITH YOUR FRIENDS.

Stonewall_Inn_1969Selma and Stonewall are different, yet the same. It is the "sameness" that Truth in Progress shares with those who seek civil rights, human rights, for all. Too often we fail to remember that at Stonewall, there were persons of color and that at Selma there were white persons.

Gil went to Selma after "Bloody Sunday with a group from Boston. Among those who made that trip was Rev. James Reeb, a white Unitarian minister. He and some of his Unitarian friends visited a restaurant together in Selma after they had marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge earlier. As Jim Reeb and the others left the restaurant, he was beaten severely and later died. Gil participated in his memorial service at Arlington Street Unitarian Church in Boston, and upon his return to Selma 45 years after his first visit, he was pleased to see the plaque erected in memory of Rev. James Reeb.


Frederick Douglass, the African American anti-slavery Abolitionist said, "If there is no struggle there is no progress." Selma and Stonewall will forever remind us respectively, of the struggles for black civil rights and LGBTQ civil rights. History will point out that had there been no struggle at Selma or Stonewall, the progress we have seen for blacks and for gays would not be what it is today. The struggles of course continue, and we allow what took place at Selma and Stonewall to inspire and ignite us.

The power of the human story to connect people, bring deeper meaning, and unite rather than divide is immeasurable. When a people rise up together, out of the struggle, there is a power that is unstoppable. FROM SELMA TO STONEWALL will be a resource for audiences, individuals, national and local organizations, and classroom studies. Please back this goal by making a donation today.

On this JUNETEENTH, freedom is on time!